The first HTNS Award was granted in 1989. Click here to read about winners from years past.

Awards

HTNS Built Heritage Awards


WINNERS 2013

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2013 COMMERCIAL AWARD
The Bank of Nova Scotia (Main Branch), 1706 Hollis St., Halifax, NS –The Bank of Nova Scotia

2013 INSTITUTIONAL AWARD
The Painted House of Maud Lewis, 1723 Hollis St., Halifax, NS – The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

2013 MARY SCHAEFER PLACES OF WORSHIP AWARD
l’Église Sainte-Marie, 1713 Hwy. 1, Church Point, NS – The Church Community of Sainte-Marie

 


2013 COMMERCIAL AWARD

The Bank of Nova Scotia (Main Branch)
1706 Hollis Street, Halifax, NS
The Bank of Nova Scotia

photoThe Bank of Nova Scotia was awarded the Built Heritage Award in the Commercial category for the 2013 restoration of the Main Banking Hall and in recognition of the Bank’s long-term commitment to the conservation and good stewardship of this Halifax landmark building. The designated Provincial Heritage Property, completed in 1931, was designed by noted Canadian architect John McIntosh Lyle and is a stunning example of Renaissance inspired architecture. Sheathed in marble, bronze and wood, the Main Banking Hall encompasses many elements of Beaux-Art design and is the most spectacular of the interior spaces. The decorative elements were meticulously designed by Lyle to incorporate symbols of Canadian plants, animals and industry with an emphasis on Nova Scotian marine themes.

photoThe project was undertaken to provide necessary upgrades to electrical and communication services, provide office and teller spaces to better meet the needs of the Bank’s staff and customers and to replace the worn window treatments. To ensure the heritage appearance of the Banking Hall would not be compromised Taylor Hazell Architects Ltd. of Toronto were engaged, a firm specializing in heritage restoration. The new electrically operated sunshades allow the Hall to be flooded with natural light and draw the eye to the beautiful metalwork screening at the windows. With the relocation of the tellers, portions of the original marble counter (retained since a 1958 renovation) were able to be refitted. The all glass offices were carefully designed to allow views through to the marble wall paneling and windows thereby maintaining visual continuity. A well planned and executed restoration.

2013 INSTITUTIONAL AWARD

The Painted House of Maud Lewis
1723 Hollis Street, Halifax, NS
The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

photoThe Art Gallery of Nova Scotia was awarded the Built Heritage Award in the Institutional category for the conservation of the Painted House of Maud Lewis. Despite the best efforts of a local society, formed to preserve the Lewis house in situ, it became obvious sufficient funding could not be raised. In 1984 at the “eleventh hour” the Province of Nova Scotia purchased the house to save it from imminent destruction due to natural causes and turned it over to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. It was a long journey from the time it left Marshalltown on a flatbed to the day of the opening of the Maud Lewis Gallery. There were many obstacles to be overcome, not the least of which was the Gallery had no space to display the house.

Once the Gallery acquired the Provincial Building addition at 1723 Hollis Street work began in earnest. Since the opening of the Maud Lewis Gallery in June 1998 it has been the most visited exhibit in the Gallery. There is something in the spirit of Maud Lewis’ images that speaks to a wide audience, from school children to sophisticated, world travelers.

photoThe project was daunting in scope. The house had to be dismantled into ten pieces in order to get it into its new setting so work could begin. The deterioration of the building’s envelope had to be addressed followed by the conservation of the myriad painted surfaces. For Maud, the walls, windows, doors and every other available surface were canvases necessitating art conservation on metal ware, linoleum, wood, paper and glass. Given the parlous condition of the house and artwork much credit is due to the dedicated, talented team of conservators for conserving most of the house and its paintings. Where conservation was not possible, meticulous restoration was done. Under the protection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia the Painted House of Maud Lewis will continue to delight its many visitors.

2013 MARY SCHAEFER PLACES OF WORSHIP AWARD

l’Église Sainte-Marie
1713 Hwy. 1, Church Point, NS
The Church Community of Sainte-Marie
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photoThe Mary Schaefer Places of Worship Award was presented to the Church Community of Sainte-Marie for the long-term commitment to the conservation of l’Église Sainte-Marie. This unique Nova Scotia church, a designated Provincial Heritage Property, was completed in l905. It was the result of a collaborative effort between a French priest and local master carpenter, Leo Melanson and based on French Romanesque Revival style designs of French architect August Regneault. As the largest wooden church in North America with a 185-foot spire, it dominates the landscape in the small community of Church Point. Upon entering, visitors are instilled with a sense of awe at the grandeur of the high vaulted ceilings, large nave and transepts. The interior and exterior of this architecturally significant building, for the most part, have been conserved as built.

photoSainte-Marie was built by a large team of volunteers from the community and incredibly was completed within two years. It was a focal point for this Acadian community when it was erected and has continued to be an icon to their faith, culture and history. For over 100 years, generations of the same families have worked to ensure this landmark church was conserved. But times have changed; no longer are volunteers permitted to swing on a rope to repair the spire, nor use homemade scaffolding to work on the shingled cladding. Dedicated volunteers within the church community are now establishing a not-for-profit society to raise funds so that their good stewardship of this remarkable church may continue.